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Caffeine and Calcium

*independent of age, obesity, years
since menopause, and the use of tobacco, estrogen, alcohol,"

It would seem this study claims that any of the above mentioned factors should not be taken into consideration when looking at the impact of caffeine on calcium.

Perhaps I misunderstand the meaning of "independent of."

The fact is most studies done prior to 2000 (this study was published in 1994) ignored these factors as being unimportant, which allowed coffee drinkers to be lumped together with smokers and users of alcohol in looking at the effects of caffeine.

Quote from a study done in 2001. Note the slim margin of women affected, and that it required a rare genetic factor to be present for any significant reduction in bone loss.

"a caffeine intake of more than 300 mg/day was associated with a higher rate of bone loss at most of the skeletal sites in the spine, although the difference was only significant in subjects carrying the homozygous tt genotype of VDR. Women in the high caffeine category with the tt genotype lost bone density over 3years, compared with no change in bone density the tt women in the low caffeine group.

Though the number of women with the tt genotype was relatively small (6 in the low caffeine group and 5 in the high caffeine group), these findings identify caffeine as a dietary factor, which can alter one's genetic predisposition toward osteoporosis. An editorial by Massey stresses that moderate caffeine ingestion-less than 16 ounces of brewed coffee per day or 32 ounces of brewed tea-is not associated with increased bone loss. Until it is practical to determine each person's VDR genotype, physicians should recommend both adequate dietary calcium and moderate caffeine consumption for their elderly patients. "

Copied from Science Daily. Link below.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/10/011024073604.htm

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